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Mexican Wines on the Rise

September 7, 2016
Mexican Wines on the Rise

Mexico is world-renowned for its production of beer. While tequila is among the globally recognized Mexican beverages, in recent years, mezcal has also become internationally known. The difference between the two is the type of agave used, as the production processes for the two spirits is quite similar. Despite their popularity, and the popular belief that mezcal is good for one’s health, Mexican wine has made impressive progress. As if becoming an extension to California’s Napa Valley, the last 20 years have seen a tremendous expansion of vineyards on the Baja California peninsula and in the Valle de Guadalupe region. The Valle de Guadalupe’s climate is comparable to that of Bordeaux, France and Rioja, Spain, albeit more arid. Mexican producers have learned new techniques as a result of their exchanges with producers in Spain, France and the U.S., particularly in the states of California, Oregon and Washington, which have enabled them to produce increasingly high quality wines. Nevertheless, wine is not new to Mexico. It was introduced by the Spanish after they colonized the country, and specifically as a result of its use in religious rituals and as an indispensable companion to meals. Currently, there are countless wine producers in Mexico, and the quality and price of many of these products allows them to compete in the U.S., European and South American markets. The expansion of Mexican vineyards has led to an upsurge of tourist and recreational activities centered on the wine industry. For instance, boutique hotels, international fine dining restaurants, shops and other attractions have increased, all related to the enjoyment of wine. The wine-making region of Baja California shows visitors from around the world an industry on the rise that, even today, maintains the familial nature of its featured wines. However, this will likely not last forever, as some predict that growing success and the expansion of hundreds of vineyards may well lead to industrialization of Mexican wine.

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